Serving Preschool Through 8th Grade in the San Francisco East Bay Since 1962
Lower School Specialties

Physical Education

An attitude of respect for, and a nurturing and positive use of, their bodies is the predominant theme of our physical education classes.

Did you know?

Each Spring, Seven Hills Lower School students train for, and participate in Jump Rope for Heart – a fundraiser for the American Heart Association.

Lower School Physical Education

Not everyone is athletic but at Seven Hills everyone enjoys our physical education program. With our belief that fitness is for life, Lower School P.E. teacher, Tina Ory, emphasizes healthy habits that include movement, positive attitudes, knowledge of the body and good sportsmanship incorporating both the Kimochi system and positive reinforcement. The physical education program is designed for students of all skill levels.
 
Children become proficient, confident and comfortable with their individual strengths as our P.E. classes use our full-size gymnasium, rock wall, all-weather turf field,  heated swimming pool, and both the upper and lower courts. Additionally, the program incorporates grade-specific field trips for students to enjoy gymnastics and rock climbing, bowling, roller skating and ice skating with buddies, general fitness activities and hiking. These activities inspire Seven Hills families to enjoy these same activities together during their own family outings.
 
Manipulative skills (throwing, catching, striking, volleying), locomotor skills (running, hopping, skipping, dodging), and non-locomotor (balance, weight transfer, jumping, and spatial and body awareness) are taught using balls, dance, jump ropes, martial arts, swimming and running activities. As children get older, regulation games are introduced with an emphasis on participation and sportsmanship. Children learn the bones and muscles of their bodies and how each work individually and in cooperation with the others. An attitude of respect for, and a nurturing and positive use of, their bodies is the predominant theme of our physical education classes. 
 
Although recess is not an official component of the P.E. program, we believe that it is a vital part of a student’s school day. Many of the games and skills taught in P.E. are utilized during recess times and, although all recesses are well-supervised, children have an opportunity to problem solve, employ free choice and good sportsmanship and to choose movement activities with minimal adult interaction. 

TEACHER